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The Press Release

Hundred Years Late
Presenting
SOME POPULAR SONGS from 1914
Arranged for Modern Sensibilities
& Recorded Using Modern Methods

Album out DECEMBER 15th on Bandcamp
The Slumber Boat video now on YouTube.

This unique album features twelve modern reinterpretations of songs which were written, published, recorded, or released in 1914.

Musician and songwriter David Nelligan began this ‘music archive revival project’ Hundred Years Late last year as part of his masters research, and has been encouraging modern musicians to delve into the archives and put their own spin on the songs they discover there. The idea is to celebrate the musicians and songwriters of the past, and encourage modern musicians and songwriters to engage with archival resources and participate in a kind of inter-generational cultural cross-pollination. Throughout the year, David has been curating his own favourite songs from the archives and enlisting some of his favourite musicians to help him record them, while writing a blog highlighting some wonderful songs from 1914 and the stories of the people behind them.

The somewhat formal style of the time, the lack of a modern rhythm section, and the scratchiness and general poor sound quality of these old recordings can make songs from this era inaccessible to modern listeners. But when performed and interpreted by modern musicians, the songs seem suddenly vibrant and relevant again. There’s a tenderness, a naïveté, a melodramatic sincerity about the lyrics that seems so fresh and free of cynicism. Musically, there’s a wide variety of styles covered. Some songs are playful and jazzy, others melancholic and avant-garde. Then there’s blues, gospel, rock and pop, but not as we know them. They don’t write them like this anymore.

You are cordially invited to come and listen to this strange and nostalgic album of cover versions.

The album will be available on Bandcamp on Monday December 15th.

To whet your appetite, Hundred Years Late have produced a charming animated video for lullaby The Slumber Boat. It is sung by guest vocalist Lynda Cullen, a Cork-based singer-songwriter whose album Paper Boat was released earlier this year to critical acclaim. The sleeping baby illustrations used in the video are in the public domain, taken from a magazine published in 1914.

The general health and well-being of the public domain is one of the issues that inspired this project. If culture can be locked up in copyright restrictions for 95 years, then remix artists across all genres and media are limited to using vintage material. Rather than complain about what can’t be done, this project aims to demonstrate what can be done with the public domain. All the artwork used for the project is in the public domain, or licensed for reuse under Creative Commons. The songs covered here are of course in the public domain, and the Hundred Years Late recordings of them are also licensed under Creative Commons. Here is the track listing, with links to archive recordings…

1) When You’re A Long Long Way From Home
2) Where My Caravan Has Rested
3) You Broke My Heart To Pass The Time Away
4) The Monotone (Ein Ton)
5) I Want To Be Like Jesus
6) Oft In The Stilly Night
7) If I Were The Ocean And You Were The Shore
8) The Slumber Boat
9) Can’t You Hear Me Callin’, Caroline?
10) Old Folks At Home
11) Crossing The Bar
12) I Cannot Sing The Old Songs

SOME POPULAR SONGS FROM 1914 marks a surprising change of creative direction for David Nelligan. His band, The David Nelligan Thing, released alt-pop-folk-rock album ‘Dark Matters’ in April last year to some acclaim, followed in August by the stylistically divergent electro-synth-pop E.P. ‘Who Is Synthia?’ which notably put Shakespeare’s poetry to music. His academic pursuits necessitated a brief hiatus from the band, during which time this Hundred Years Late album came about. If you would like to know more, visit hundredyearslate.com

Album Progress Report

I’ve mentioned a few times that I’ve been working on recording an album of songs for this project. In the last month I finalised the track listing, did more work on final arrangements and mixes, and invited some guest musicians to perform on these recordings. I’ve been giving it a lot of time and attention. But with a dissertation to write as well, I fear I won’t have much more time to devote to the album in order to finish it before the end of September, let alone release it.

I released an album of original songs last year, and without doubt the hardest part for me was not performing, arranging, or recording the songs. The hardest part was what you would call ‘post-production’. Mastering is a highly technical process. A mastering engineer is equal parts scientist and artist. They play with the frequency spectrum of the final song mix, finessing the sound to achieve the best possible results for that final mix on all kinds of speakers. It’s also the part of the audio production chain where consistency between different songs is achieved to make a coherent overall sound for an album, with careful and skilled use of compression, limiters, and all kinds of other technical tools, sound levels can appear consistent throughout an album even when vastly different instrumentation is used on different songs. That’s quite a technical feat. And this is where I see myself spending most time to finish this album. Since I can’t afford to get anything mastered professionally, I’m going to have to do it myself, mostly by trial-and-error.

That’s what I did last year when I released ‘Dark Matters’. I spent weeks mixing, remixing, mastering, remixing, back and forth between different songs on different programs. The final results were good, I think. But not as good as a professional (with professional equipment and professional experience) could have done in a fraction of the time. It was a compromise. But without making this compromise, I couldn’t have released an album at all.

Then I had to promote the album. I spent a couple of months trying to find every music blog I could that features independent music. Then I emailed them all, a few hundred of them anyway. A group email is a big no-no. You have to personalise the emails, write enough at least so they know that you know who you’re talking to and you’ve read their blog. You’ve got to write hundreds of these personalised emails. Having researched other people’s release strategies, I decided to make a few music videos and release one a week in the weeks preceding the album launch. This would give music reviewers a few chances to hear my music before the album launch, without annoying them by sending the same press release over and over – I was giving them something new each time. Over a month I sent over 1500 emails, all personalised. I also had to make five music videos. As I was pretty new to video production, this was insanely ambitious. Being insanely ambitious has kind of become my hallmark. So as I was finishing recording the album, I divided my time between researching music blogs, making music videos, finalising the mixes, experimenting with mastering, designing the artwork, writing emails and press releases, and rehearsing with my live band to learn all the new songs. I set a release date in April. Between January and April I worked sixteen-hour days (a conservative estimate).

If you pick up any album that’s been successfully commercially released, there’s a list of credits as long as your arm. Musicians, producers, promoters, management, record companies. I tried to be all those things. And this is the part that people don’t understand. I didn’t envision massive commercial success myself, not for this first release. My reward was not to be monetary. I had made something I was proud of. By taking on the impossible challenge of single-handedly marketing it, I was further investing in myself. This time was spent turning me into the kind of person I want to be. As the years before my first release were spent learning all I could about songwriting and music and audio production, this was my first step in learning how to market my skills, and picking up other skills too. Failure does not faze me because I’ve been extraordinarily productive. I have a definite artistic sensibility (frequently characterised by taking on seemingly-impossible challenges). I have ‘creative confidence’. I have faith in my own creative abilities. I’ve worked extremely hard to hone my skills, and been fearless to experiment and try things out. My first album was a modest critical success (i.e. some people really liked it). In commercial terms, it was a dismal failure (as most music released these days is). But I see myself as an artist creating a body of work. As I was releasing the album, I was already writing songs for the next release. My first album had songs in very different styles, but was mostly guitar-based with arrangements for a live band. My next release was very different. It was an E.P. of synth-and-beat based songs (including an electro-pop version of ‘Who Is Silvia?’ by William Shakespeare).

Having immersed myself in the music blogosphere last year with these two very different releases, I came to some generalised conclusions about modern music. Firstly, most people seem to listen to ‘production’ first. Production is important, no doubt. I’ve spent a lot of time on it. But it does not, and should not ever, trump melody. I believe I have a melodic sensibility, though I’m not sure it can be defined or analysed easily. I’ve written hundreds of songs, and possibly tens of thousands of melodic lines. I’ve obsessively listened to a wide variety of music for at least the last twenty years. And melody is always the deciding factor for me, melody is the soul of the music. Rhythm is the life and melody is the soul. I often deconstruct music into its constituent parts as I’m listening to it. When a music reviewer raves about a certain song, I listen to it and I think… yes, I can see why they like this. The production is really good. The arrangement is inventive and unusual. But if the melody is boring and derivative, I can’t enjoy the music. Melody and lyrics are important to me. They’re what I love the most. And they’re the most undervalued things in modern music.

This was partially why I wanted to record an album of songs ‘rescued’ from the archives. If these songs still resonate with me, a modern musician, a hundred years after their release – I think there must be something universal about their appeal, something ‘timeless’ in the lyrics and melodies. The sentimental, melodramatic lyrics are a million miles away from the cynically calculated lyrical content of many of our most commercially successful modern songwriters. I found a charming naïveté there, I sensed sincerity in the writing and the performances. Recording modern versions of these songs was a huge learning experience for me in a musical sense as well. Making piano my main instrument for the album was ambitious, I’ve never received any formal instruction in piano playing. Then again, I’ve never received any formal musical education of any kind, I taught myself to play guitar in my teens and piano in my late twenties. This has been, and will continue to be, a labour of love. I’ll release it before the end of the year. But I think I’ll have to wait until after my dissertation, so it will be October before I start to formulate a release strategy and work on the mastering. I want to do these songs, and all my collaborators, justice.

While it may be a mad folly of mine to put all this work into recording an album of vintage songs, I regret nothing. I’ve learned so much. And I’m still learning. I’d love to be able to release a ‘sister’ album to my own, an album of contributions from anyone who has seen this project and decided to participate. So far, I haven’t had enough contributions to consider doing this. But the ones I’ve had have been fantastic and have only made me hungry for more. If you’re a musician, dig into the archives, find a song you like, and record it. I’ve complicated things for myself by recording twelve songs and having guest performers, but any modern musician could take up the challenge and give this a try. If you do, I guarantee you’ll learn something.